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  • Cedric Nicholson

The most valuable commodity

Updated: Apr 26


When we think of commodities, we usually think of gold, diamonds, oil, food and other tangible goods. It's rightfully so that those things would come to the forefront of our minds especially when value is measured by the almighty dollar. The value of these commodities constantly fluctuate and a person could lose it all and then turn around and gain all back in a matter of months, or years. If something can so easily be lost and regained, then is it really valuable? Outside of a living organism, the one most valuable commodity that I consider that can't be replaced is time. Time to me is the most valuable commodity because once it's gone, that moment, hour, or year will never be the same, and the most successful people in business understand this principle. How you spend your time determines how successful you will be in business, in your relationships, and with your finances. I recently just watched a YouTube video and the vlogger caught my ear with this statement about entertaining, educating and finding a balance. If you pay attention closely a lot of people want a lot of things in life but only a small percentage are willing to devote the time to do anything about it.

People will spend hours upon hours being entertained on FB, YouTube, video games, and television. I personally don't think there's nothing wrong enjoying these things, but how much valuable time do we give to be entertained? Not everyone wants to be a multi millionaire, but I believe the majority of people would like to have the money to do what they would like to do, whenever they want to do it. The reality is that it's going to take time to earn money to exchange for goods and services or time to trade for goods and services. As a coach I'm always intrigued to how clients spend their time, not to judge them but out of curiosity on how to best help them get the results that they want. One time I was working with a client, I was able to pull back the curtain and expose the time thief, the client was shocked at how much time they had given daily to a certain behavior which then led down another rabbit hole of avoidance. It's easy to give your time to an activity and loose yourself in it because you're avoiding ownership of your personal or career responsibilities. The problem masked itself as mismanagement of time but in actuality it was deeper. It is only when we look back and realize that we could be so much further if we hadn't wasted that time. So how do you avoid wasting time? First you have to be honest with yourself. Secondly you need to find a coach, a mentor to hold you accountable to see when or if you have started on that task. Third learn to tell yourself "no". Self discipline is the hardest, because the pull towards avoiding doing the task may be an ingrained behavioral trait. Fourth get in an environment that will inspire and motivate you to stay on task. If you can't stay disciplined at home then work at the office or study at the library. Consistently try these things out and see what kind of results you will yield. We all have have a finite amount of time, and no one knows how much sand we have left in our glass, so make the best of it.

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